T-Swifts new album makes us party like its 1989

There are a number of special moments in every person’s life. Graduation, marriage or having a child are most certainly examples of monumental occasions that are life-changing. There’s one more thing to add to this list, of course – one event that contains more emotions, more tears and more laughter than perhaps anything else. It is the one event that carries you through everything the world can throw at you and bring you out the other side, the one event that revolutionizes the very universe in which we live – the release of a Taylor Swift album.

On Oct. 27, Taylor Swift released her fifth studio album, 1989. Without further ado, here is the definitive ranking of the top ten world-shattering songs that our idol and savior Swift graced us with.

1. “All You Had to Do Was Stay”

The fifth song on the 1989 album must surely move even the most stoic of people. Swift, uncharacteristically, sings of heartbreak in this hit that uses vocal processing to blend her high notes with a ringing that makes the song even more memorable. She literally puts my feelings into a song – “people like me are gone forever when you say goodbye.” Sing it, girl.

2. “Welcome to New York”

Try listening to this song while strolling through the quad without letting your mind drift away into thoughts of city lights and skyscrapers. Seriously, try it. It’s impossible. This song has been perhaps the best addition from this album to my weekly yoga routine.

3. “I Wish You Would”

The beat carries this song to unexpected heights. Swift sings of – yep, you guessed it – heartbreak. But it feels like a different kind of song, even though it’s yet another song that makes you remember how much you hate everybody you ever dated. This is a great song to stick it to the man, or woman, whomever you’d prefer.

4. “Shake It Off”

For most of you, you’ve probably already heard this song while awkwardly grinding with someone you’ve never met at a Pause dance. You know that in 99 percent of social situations, dancing like this with a stranger would be considered ridiculous. But you do it anyway, because haters are going to hate, hate, hate, hate, hate. Keep swinging those hips.

5. “Blank Space”

Swift really sticks it to the world with this song. It’s catchy and sassy. What more could you want in a song? Swift makes fun of the media outlets that have created her image as a serial dater and damn does she do a good job. Another five-star song.

6. “Out of the Woods”

Co-written with Jack Antonoff and the Bleachers, “Out of the Woods” is perhaps the most unique on the album. It has a propulsive momentum that makes it irresistible. Swift sings that “the rest of the world was black and white, but we were in screaming color,” beautifully depicting either a passionate love or dangerous drugs. I’d prefer the love angle.

7. “Wildest Dreams”

This song is new territory for Swift and many have remarked that it has tones of Lana Del Rey. It has an otherworldly feel to it. It may not be one for the dance floor, but it is definitely an interesting new side of Swift that proves to be very successful.

8. “I Know Places”

Swift sings of running away from things that are trying to take her happiness away. There’s a tense drum beat in that background that brings a foreboding tone to the song. The lyrics make Swift’s meaning clear – “They are the hunters. We are the foxes. And we run.” The message in this song provides a timely reminder that we should all run away from things that challenge us or bring us down. Run to happiness, everyone.

9. “How You Get the Girl”

Despite the misleading title, this song is unfortunately a little misleading in that it doesn’t explicitly tell us exactly how to woo ladies. There are definitely some hints in here, guys, if you’re looking for help. It’s a little cliché, but it’s still catchy and memorable.

10. “Style”

I first heard this song in a Target commercial, and while I haven’t shopped at Target since the beginning of the semester when I had to buy a shower caddy, I’ll definitely go back. Anyway, this song is a reference to Swift’s short-lived relationship with Harry Styles. Direct and about a breakup. Classic Taylor. Long live the Queen.

nolans@stolaf.edu

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